The typical stereotype of Australia’s climate is sunny all year round with temperatures resembling T-Shirt & Thongs (flip flops) weather for most of the year. However, Australia is a vast continent which is roughly the size of Europe and the country stretches from the tropical north of Queensland to the cool southern tip of Tasmania. The climate you experience will ultimately depend on where you choose to live in Australia.

Typically the northern regions of Australia are wetter and warmer than the southern states and the seasons can be vastly dynamic.

Queensland, parts of northern New South Wales (Byron Bay), the Northern Territory, and the northern reaches of Western Australia (Broome) all experience some form of tropical climate. There are basically two weather seasons – a wet season and a dry season. The wet season is hot and humid over what could be called the warmer months (October through to April) while the cooler months in Autumn and Winter are generally quite dry. In these northern regions the monthly average temperature will not drop below 18 degrees Celsius (64 Fahrenheit). The further inland you move in these northern areas, the drier the climate becomes with many areas of central Australia experiencing a desert like climate.

The Northern areas like Darwin in the Northern Territory and Cairns in Queensland can be subjected to very high levels of rainfall during the wet season and there is some risk of tropical cyclones in these areas.

The southern areas of Australia are typically cooler and have a more traditional seasonal calendar of Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer. Summer months are between December and February and the temperature during these times can reach quite extreme levels of up to 40 degrees Celsius. Most rainfall in these regions falls in the cooler months during Autumn and Spring and the Winter is usually relatively dry but is often accompanied with a frosty bite at night and in the morning. Some regions of Victoria and Tasmania in particular are known to experience winter nights with temperatures often falling below zero.

Wherever you choose to live in Australia, it is important to remember that the Australian sun is particularly harsh most of the year and exposure to the sun’s rays regardless of whether the sun is shining or not can be harmful. To protect yourself from the harmful effects of the sun, it is recommended that you take the following precautionary steps to limit the potential dangers of sunburn and skin cancer.

  • Try to avoid direct sun contact between the most dangerous hours of 10.00 am and 3.00 pm especially in the middle of Summer.
  • Always wear clothing that will protect your skin from the sun. A broad brimmed hat that will protect your face neck and ears and a pair of sunglasses is a good start.
  • If you are going to be out in the sun, be sure to apply some water resistant sunscreen that has at least an SPF rating of 30 and continue to reapply throughout the day.

The Australian climate on the whole is warm and enjoyable, however its extremes can catch you unaware especially when you first arrive in Australia. Remember that the northern regions have a climate very similar to South East Asia, so if hot and humid is not your thing then you may be better suited to the more seasonal climate in the southern regions of Australia.

The typical stereotype of Australia’s climate is sunny all year round with temperatures resembling T-Shirt & Thongs (flip flops) weather for most of the year. However, Australia is a vast continent which is roughly the size of Europe and the country stretches from the tropical north of Queensland to the cool southern tip of Tasmania. The climate you experience will ultimately depend on where you choose to live in Australia.

Typically the northern regions of Australia are wetter and warmer than the southern states and the seasons can be vastly dynamic.

Queensland, parts of northern New South Wales (Byron Bay), the Northern Territory, and the northern reaches of Western Australia (Broome) all experience some form of tropical climate. There are basically two weather seasons – a wet season and a dry season. The wet season is hot and humid over what could be called the warmer months (October through to April) while the cooler months in Autumn and Winter are generally quite dry. In these northern regions the monthly average temperature will not drop below 18 degrees Celsius (64 Fahrenheit). The further inland you move in these northern areas, the drier the climate becomes with many areas of central Australia experiencing a desert like climate.

The Northern areas like Darwin in the Northern Territory and Cairns in Queensland can be subjected to very high levels of rainfall during the wet season and there is some risk of tropical cyclones in these areas.

The southern areas of Australia are typically cooler and have a more traditional seasonal calendar of Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer. Summer months are between December and February and the temperature during these times can reach quite extreme levels of up to 40 degrees Celsius. Most rainfall in these regions falls in the cooler months during Autumn and Spring and the Winter is usually relatively dry but is often accompanied with a frosty bite at night and in the morning. Some regions of Victoria and Tasmania in particular are known to experience winter nights with temperatures often falling below zero.

Wherever you choose to live in Australia, it is important to remember that the Australian sun is particularly harsh most of the year and exposure to the sun’s rays regardless of whether the sun is shining or not can be harmful. To protect yourself from the harmful effects of the sun, it is recommended that you take the following precautionary steps to limit the potential dangers of sunburn and skin cancer.

  • Try to avoid direct sun contact between the most dangerous hours of 10.00 am and 3.00 pm especially in the middle of Summer.
  • Always wear clothing that will protect your skin from the sun. A broad brimmed hat that will protect your face neck and ears and a pair of sunglasses is a good start.
  • If you are going to be out in the sun, be sure to apply some water resistant sunscreen that has at least an SPF rating of 30 and continue to reapply throughout the day.

The Australian climate on the whole is warm and enjoyable, however its extremes can catch you unaware especially when you first arrive in Australia. Remember that the northern regions have a climate very similar to South East Asia, so if hot and humid is not your thing then you may be better suited to the more seasonal climate in the southern regions of Australia.

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